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Who Are These People – Law Library Bobble-Heads

We seem to have a little bit of everything here at the Coleman Karesh Library.  We’ve got books.  We’ve got computers.  We’ve got flash cards.  We’ve got CDs and DVD’s.  If you dig deep enough you might even find some long forgotten floppy disks and VHS tapes.  But, most importantly, following the long tradition of the world’s greatest law libraries, WE”VE GOT TOYS!

Well, maybe not toys exactly.  FIGURINES! That’s it!  We’ve got figurines!  As I’m sure you know, one of our previous posts discussed Judge C. Tolbert Goolsby’s legal figurines that reside in the legal history room.  However, there is another possibly more eccentric collection in the law library entryway.

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The Coleman Karesh law library houses a small collection of Supreme Court  Bobble-Heads.  These specific bobble-heads can only be obtained by subscribers of The Green Bag: An Entertaining Law Journal.  Occasionally, without warning or schedule, The Green Bag will send out certificates to some of their subscribers.  Not every subscriber gets a certificate and not every certificate guarantees a bobble-head.  Once you receive a certificate, you then have to present it in person at a named Washington D.C. Law Firm.  Only then, hopefully, will you receive your actual physical bobbly headed figurine.

The mere existence of these figurines here at the University of South Carolina is testamentary to the dedication of your law librarians. Not only will they work tirelessly to build one of the best legal collections around, they will drive hundreds of miles for one small figurine just to add atmosphere to your Coleman Karesh experience.  So, next time you walk through that small entrance-way and glance over at the bobble heads, just remember the road they traveled to get here and take comfort in the fact that we would go to such nonsensical lengths to make your visit just a little more enjoyable.

Happy Monday !

This Week In Legal News

On Tuesday, both the Oregon House and the Iowa Senate passed bills that would prohibit health care professionals from providing therapy aimed at changing a patient’s sexual orientation or gender identity.  California is the first state in the nation to ban this type of therapy, by way of legislation enacted in 2012.

Also on Tuesday, the Indiana Senate voted unanimously to allow terminally ill patients to get access to experimental drugs and treatments that are not yet approved for sale on the open market.

On Wednesday, the South Carolina Supreme Court held that an exotic dancer wounded while performing was an employee, not an independent contractor, and therefore entitled to workers’ compensation.

 

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Karen Taylor

taylorKaren Taylor is the Head of Access Services at the Law Library.  Ms. Taylor is our senior-most librarian and you can find her in the office behind the Circulation Desk.  We asked her a few questions to get to know her a little better.

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question: What’s your favorite book?  Trustee from the Toolroom by Nevil Shute

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  Archaeologist

3.  What profession would you not like to do?  Doctor

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  Swimming

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  My best friend

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  Great Britain

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7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  Gardening

8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  Last week, at home

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  Claire Randall (from the Outlander series)

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  Keep the search simple

 

 

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Spring Break, By the Numbers

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For law students, Spring Break exists as an unmistakable “calm before the storm.”  It’s the week of freedom before the anxiety-laden pressure cooker that is law school finals.  Informal polling shows students go everywhere from as far as South America to as close as their own sofa.  The overarching trend, however, is that they stay far, far, away from the law library.

As you can imagine, when spring break hits the Coleman Karesh Law Library becomes a much different place.  What you might not guess is that we have the numbers to prove it.  You may not know this but every time you enter or leave the library a small laser beam counts your passing.  This means that we have a numerical indicator of every time someone enters or leaves the library.  So, by dividing by the number in two we can tell exactly how many people come into the library each day.  These numbers show exactly how lonely the law library gets during down times like holidays and spring breaks.

The library, on a good student day averages between 800 and 1000 people.  The biggest flow is in the middle of the day, with less in the morning and late afternoon.  On Spring break, these numbers are about 1/8 of what they are during class times.  For instance, this past Monday, the first day of spring break, we had 91 visitors.  The Monday before that we had 845.  Striking right?

So, what does this mean?

I’m glad you asked.  There are a few unmistakable differences about the law school, library and the University of South Carolina in general over Spring Break.

  1.     Crowds – There are none.  It is significantly easier to get from one end of the building to the other.  The bathrooms stay a lot cleaner too.
  2.     Lunch – Eating out is a lot easier, and if you bring your food back, there is room to eat out on the couches.  Nothing says comfort lunch like lunch on a sofa.
  3.     Quiet – It’s so quiet.  Eerily quiet.  From my office in the back of the library I can hear people talk at the circulation desk.  More importantly, they can hear me too.  While it is nice that we no longer need an intercom, it’s a little nerve-wracking when the people at circulation can hear every time I sneeze.

Finally

  1.     Lonely – Yes Lonely.  While we do like the quiet and the break, we also like having the students around. So, wherever you traveled to over the break, safe travels and hurry back!

 

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Joey Plumley

Joey Plumley is the Law Library’s Acquisitions and Access Services PLUMLEY, JOEY 142__084-1047Assistant.  In addition to working as a member of our Technical Services Department, you’ll find him working nights at the Circulation Desk.  We asked Joey a few questions to get to know him better!

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question:  What’s your favorite book?  The Icewind Dale Trilogy.

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  I have had a number of other professions before this one…but one I have not tried would be something in sports management.

3. What profession would you not like to do?  Not a farmer, construction worker, or miner.

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  I enjoy golf and tennis, but have not done either in a while due to a shoulder injury.

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  I would choose my mom, who passed away a number of years ago.

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  If everything would be covered, then gambling in Law Vegas!!!1_Las_vegas_strip
7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  I try to catch up on current events or my favorite TV shows when I have the chance.

8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  I recently had lunch at McCutchen House here on campus and it was very good.batman_color_by_txboi001-d4ad6u5

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  I’m Batman.

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  When asked by new law students, I always suggest that they get to know a reference librarian and make them their friend.

Pet Law And Student Pet Pictures

We all love our pets.  For many, dogs and cats are not just animals, they are members of the family.  But, what happens to your pets if something happens to you?  You provide for your human family members through your will, but what about your furry family?

Surprising enough, you can plan your estate to provide for your pets.  Pet trusts are actually recognized in the South Carolina Code at S.C. Code Ann. § 62-7-408 (1986).  Other resources suggest procedures providing for your pet including naming a guardian, naming an alternate guardian, setting aside money, and making sure the executor of your estate knows they will be executing the pet portion as well.  If you’re interested in learning more about pet trusts and pet estate planning, check out some of the links below.

South Carolina Trust Care for Animal Statute

Pet Trusts – Caring for Your Pet After Your Death

ASPCA – Planned Giving

Since we’re talking about pets, here are some pet pictures from the students and professors of groups 7 & 8 Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing here at the University of South Carolina School of Law.

Charlotte the Cat

Charlotte Hollingsworth

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Riley Lusk

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Nameless Animal Groves (Someone forgot to attach a pet name)

 

 

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Cpt. Rocky Linowski

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Cecil Milligan

 

 

Lola Beagle

Big Lola Parsons

 

This Week In Legal News

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of Alabama issued an order halting same-sex marriages, in spite of Federal court direction to issue licenses.

Also on Tuesday, Slovenia became the eleventh nation in the European Union to recognize same-sex marriage.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Justice released a report indicating that it will not prosecute the former Ferguson, MO, police officer who shot and killed unarmed African-American teenager, Michael Brown, in August of 2014.  Read the full report here.  Another DOJ report investigating the Ferguson police department, also released Wednesday, found that African Americans were frequently victims of discriminatory and illegal conduct by the law enforcement system in Ferguson.

Also on Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in King v. Burwell, which challenges the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act.

A Massachusetts teen has been charged with involuntary manslaughter after allegedly using text messages to encourage a friend’s suicide.

 

 

 

Celebrating Women’s History Month: Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act

In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month.  In recognition of this, we are taking a look back at the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.  The Act arose out of a Supreme Court case.

Lilly Ledbetter was an employee at the Goodyear Plant in Gadsden, Alabama.  Upon receiving an anonymous note revealing the salaries of her three male co-managers, she filed a complaint with the EEOC.  She had previously been the victim of sexual harassment at her workplace and had been told by her boss that he didn’t think a woman should be working at the plant.  Her case went to trial and the jury awarded her back-pay, as well as millions in compensatory and punitive damages for the discrimination she had faced.

The Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit reversed the jury’s verdict, arguing that the case was filed too late–despite the fact that she continued to receive discriminatory pay.  They reasoned that the company’s decision to pay her less than her male counterparts had been made years earlier.  The Supreme Court upheld the Eleventh Circuit’s decision in a 5-4 opinion, stating that employees can’t challenge ongoing pay discrimination if the original decision to pay the employee in a discriminatory fashion occurred more than 180 days earlier–even if that employee was continuing to be paid less.

The decision upset longstanding precedent under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and undermined Congress’s objectives to eliminate workplace discrimination.  In her dissenting opinion, Justice Ginsberg said pointed out that someone could still take action to fix this discriminatory treatment– “[o]nce again, the ball is in Congress’ court.”

In less than two years, Congress did just that, passing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009.  Under the act, each discriminatory paycheck resets the 180-day limit to file a claim, rather than the original decision to discriminate.  This allows employees who are unaware of discrimination initially to challenge pay discrimination when they find out about it.

To listen to the Supreme Court oral arguments or read the opinion, visit Oyez.

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Rebekah Maxwell

spellslinger-1In addition to teaching in the first-year Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing program, Rebekah Maxwell is the Associate Director for Library Operations.  We asked her a few questions to get to know her a little better.

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question: What’s your favorite book?  The Dark Tower series by Stephen Kingdark-tower-covers1

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  Mortuary Science

3.  What profession would you not like to do?  Euthanasia tech at animal shelter

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  Walking

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  Freddie Mercury

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  Cumberland Island, GAcumberland

7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  Walking to my car…

sherlock-holmes-147255_6408.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  Last week at Taco Time on Garner’s Ferry

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  Sherlock Holmes

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  Follow instructions