Monthly Archives: June 2013

Great Resources: HeinOnline – U.S. Supreme Court Library

This fourteenth iheinonline-logonstallment continues our series on HeinOnline’s digital collections.

HeinOnline includes a database entitled “U.S. Supreme Court Library,” which features a vast array of materials having to do with the history and decisions of the United States Supreme Court.  Users have access to official U.S. Reports going back to 1754, and recent U.S. Reports Preliminary Prints and Slip Opinions.  These resources may be browsed in chronological order or searched by text, case title, or date.  In addition to official reports, there are various periodical materials available, including the Journal of the Supreme Court of the United States, which is available dating back to 1902.  These materials are also arranged in chronological order and may be searched using the same search options as the official reports.  Another section in the database includes books written about the Court, giving users access to more in-depth resources on a particular topic, case, or justice.  The books are focused on historical materials, with few resources more recent than the 1960’s.  Users may navigate the books in alphabetical order, or by doing a search within a particular book.  Searching within all titles, including the official reports and periodical materials, is also available.  This database is easy to navigate and provides a great deal of useful research materials about the Court, both recent and historical.

To access the U.S. Supreme Court Library, go to http://www.law.sc.edu/library/limited_access/ and select HeinOnline.

To read up on other HeinOnline digital collections, see our coverage of the Congress and the Courts collection, the History of Supreme Court Nominations collection, the Session Laws Library/State Statutes: A Historical Archive, the U.S. International Trade Library, the Children’s Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Collection, the State Attorney General Reports and Opinions, the American Indian Law Collection, the World Constitutions Illustrated collection, the Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Parts I and II collection, the U.S. Presidential Library, English Reports, and World Trials Library.

Supreme Court Wrap-Up

With the Supreme Court releasing the final, controversial opinions of the term, SCOTUSblog has released the October Term 2012 Stat Packsupreme courtIt includes statistics on which Circuit’s decisions were reversed the most (the Ninth Circuit–again), how many opinions each Justice issued (Justice Thomas issued the most, with twenty-five), who authored the most 5-4 opinions (Justice Alito, with six), and which Justice was in the majority most frequently (Justice Kennedy).  The report also tracks the agreement between Justices for all pairings, with Justices Ginsburg and Kagan agreeing the most frequently–ninety-six percent of the time.

SCOTUSblog also noted an interesting alignment in 5-4 decisions.  While the conservative bloc of the court (Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Thomas, and Alito made up the majority in ten of twenty-three 5-4 majorities, in three opinions, Justices Breyer and Scalia traded places, as Justice Scalia aligned himself with Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan.

There is much, much more in the Stat Pack, so check it out!

Great Resources: HeinOnline – World Trials Library

This thirteenth installment continues our series on HeinOnline’s digital collections.

heinonline-logoFor anyone interested in famous trials from around the world, HeinOnline offers the World Trials Library.  This database provides access to trial transcripts and reports from some of history’s most famous and significant trials, such as the trials of Sacco & Vanzetti and Leopold & Loeb, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, and the Nixon Grand Jury Records, just to name a few.  It also includes several resources relating to the Nuremberg Trials, including Trials of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal and Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression.  The database also features many other significant compilations such as John Lawson’s American State Trials and Howell’s State Trials.  These trial transcripts, reports, and records can provide invaluable insight into the various subjects with which these trials were concerned, as well as how the attorneys handled these difficult cases.

HeinOnline has also included over 1,300 scholarly articles related to these famous world trials, as well as biographies of some of the most famous trial attorneys, including Max D. Steuer and James Horace Wood.

To access the World Trials Library, go here and select HeinOnline.

To read up on other HeinOnline digital collections, see our coverage of the Congress and the Courts collection, the History of Supreme Court Nominations collection, the Session Laws Library/State Statutes: A Historical Archive, the U.S. International Trade Library, the Children’s Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Collection, the State Attorney General Reports and Opinions, the American Indian Law Collection, the World Constitutions Illustrated collection, the Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Parts I and II collection, the U.S. Presidential Library, and English Reports.

Legal News of the Day: Supreme Court Overturns DOMA

In a long-awaited and highly debated ruling this morning, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional as a violation of the equal liberties guaranteed under the Fifth Amendment. The holding only applies to those same-sex couples lawfully married within a state authorizing same-sex marriage. The Court deliberately chose not to address the issue of whether states may continue to exercise their authority to restrict the definition of marriage to a union between a man and a woman.

Justice Kennedy wrote the opinion, with dissents from Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Scalia, Thomas, and Alito.

Great Resources: HeinOnline – English Reports

This twelfth installment continues our series on HeinOnline’s digital collections.

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Curious about the older cases your textbook mentions but spends less than a note discussing? Are you enrolled in English Legal History or a similar class and need a source for older English materials? Or perhaps you would like to see a full report of an English decision such as Price v. Neal (familiar to those who have studied the law of negotiable instruments – and easily searchable in this collection) in its original context?

Then this could be just what you have been searching for: HeinOnline’s English Reports collection, comprised of more than 100,000 cases, is a great resource for anyone interested in the development of English law or legal history. This expansive collection chronicles a full reprint of the English Reports, spanning the years 122o-1867, as well as the compiled Statutes of the Realm (1235-1713).

If the thought of trying to navigate older materials seems nebulous, fear not: the collection is searchable by case name, two formats of citation, and even by key word search! A “Chart of Reports” is also available, which provides a table of reporter names with corresponding volumes (as well as the appropriate abbreviations and other information).

To access the English Reports collection in Hein, click here, select HeinOnline under “Legal Search Engines Research,” and select the collection from the list to your left. Happy Researching!

To read up on other HeinOnline digital collections, see our coverage of the Congress and the Courts collection, the History of Supreme Court Nominations collection, the Session Laws Library/State Statutes: A Historical Archive, the U.S. International Trade Library, the Children’s Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Collection, the State Attorney General Reports and Opinions, the American Indian Law Collection, the World Constitutions Illustrated collection, the Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Parts I and II collection, and the U.S. Presidential Library.

Legal News of the Day: Baby Veronica Case is a Victory for Adoptive Parents

Supreme CourtThis morning, the Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision, that the provisions of the Indian Child Welfare Act at question in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl were not designed to apply to circumstances like Baby Veronica’s, where the child’s “removal” is not causing an Indian family’s “break-up.”  Baby Veronica’s biological father never held legal or physical custody of the child.  This is the interpretation put forth by the adoptive parents.  Justice Sotomayor wrote the dissent, joined by Justices Ginsburg and Kagan in full with Justice Scalia joining in part.

Previously, the South Carolina Supreme Court had given custody of the girl to her biological father, ruling that the Indian Child Welfare Act barred the adoption.  The Supreme Court reversed the judgment and remanded for further proceedings.  For more information on this case, see SCOTUSblog’s analysis.

Legal News of the Day: SCOTUS Limits Use of Affirmative Action

Today, the Supreme Court finally issued its decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, which challenged the university’s use of race in its admission process for undergraduates.  The Court did not outlaw affirmative action programs, as many had feared, instead reinforcing that the use of affirmative action by a university must meet the “strict scrutiny” test, in a 7-1 decision.  Under this type of scrutiny, a university’s use of affirmative action is constitutional only if it is “narrowly tailored.”  The court went on to explain that courts applying this test will need to confirm that the use of race is necessary to create a diverse student body.  Supreme CourtBecause the lower court in Fisher had not done so, the Court sent the case back down so it could determine whether the University of Texas at Austin could show that the use of race is necessary.

For much more analysis on Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, see SCOTUSblog’s coverage here and here.

Great Resources: HeinOnline – U.S. Presidential Library

This eleventh installment continues our series on HeinOnline’s digital collections.

heinonline-logoU.S. Presidential Library is a resource on HeinOnline that gives users access to a variety of materials dealing with past Presidents of the United States.  The library contains resources having to do with specific presidents, as well as resources dealing with a specific topic as applied to a few or many presidents.  There is a great deal of information about various aspects of Abraham Lincoln’s life, including a book of funny stories Lincoln liked to tell, books about Lincoln’s career as a lawyer, and a memoir written by Lincoln after he had been elected President, but before he took office.  Users have access to a book called “First Ladies of the White House (in Miniature)”, written in 1941 by a woman who created detailed miniature doll-sized versions of each first lady through Eleanor Roosevelt.  The book has a picture of each miniature, with an accompanying brief biography and description of what she is wearing.  The library contains various speeches, including a collection of inaugural addresses through George H.W. Bush, a eulogy of George Washington, and transcripts from the proceedings of the “Great Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson.”  Images of materials and notes from Richard Nixon’s grand jury proceedings are available to view, and there are many additional resources dealing with the Watergate hearings.  These are just a few of the wide variety of materials that are available on HeinOnline’s U.S. Presidential Library, and this is resource would be useful and valuable for performing detailed research on U.S. Presidents, as well as providing lots of interesting materials for anyone who enjoys reading about past Presidents.   Users may browse the resources alphabetically, or may search the database for something specific using a variety of search tools.

To access the U.S. Presidential Library, go to http://www.law.sc.edu/library/limited_access/ and select HeinOnline.

To read up on other HeinOnline digital collections, see our coverage of the Congress and the Courts collection, the History of Supreme Court Nominations collection, the Session Laws Library/State Statutes: A Historical Archive, the U.S. International Trade Library, the Children’s Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Collection, the State Attorney General Reports and Opinions, the American Indian Law Collection, the World Constitutions Illustrated collection, and the Taxation and Economic Reform in America, Parts I and II.

Legal News of the Day: Supreme Court Says “No” to Arizona Voting Law

On Monday, the Supreme struck down a voter-approved Arizona law requiring prospective voters to prove U.S. citizenship before being to permitted to use the expedited federal “motor voter” registration form. The “motor voter” form allows prospective voters to register while applying for licenses with the state department of motor vehicles.

In addition to Arizona, four other states–Alabama, Kansas, Georgia, and Tennessee–have similar laws that are affected by the Supreme Court’s ruling. Read more about the Supreme Court decision here.

Great Resources: HeinOnline – Taxation & Economic Reform in America Parts I & II

This tenth installment continues our series on HeinOnline’s digital collections.

heinonline-logoHeinOnline provides an invaluable resource for anyone interested in U.S. and International Tax Law with its database, Taxation & Economic Reform in America Parts I & II.  This database features the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as well as the Carlton Fox Collection – Internal Revenue Acts of the United States, 1909-1950, the largest collection of legislative history concerning American tax law ever compiled.  This collection is equipped with a helpful, custom-built index tool to assist in finding documents and in tracing the development of the law over time.  The database also includes William H. Manz’s Legislative History of the United States Tax Conventions (an essential resource for researching tax treaties between the U.S. and other nations), along with numerous books, treatises and essays concerning U.S. and International Tax Law.

For those more concerned with the history of economic reform, stock reform, stimulus plans, and other economic regulations of the United States, this database provides the largest collection of legislative histories available on these topics, including the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, the Banking Act of 1933 (commonly known as the Glass-Steagall Act), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, along with many others.  HeinOnline also provides a wealth of secondary resources concerning economic reforms.

To access Taxation & Economic Reform in America Parts I & II, click here and select HeinOnline.

To read up on other HeinOnline digital collections, see our coverage of the Congress and the Courts collection, the History of Supreme Court Nominations collection, the Session Laws Library/State Statutes: A Historical Archive, the U.S. International Trade Library, the Children’s Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Collection, the State Attorney General Reports and Opinions, the American Indian Law Collection, and the World Constitutions Illustrated collection.