Author Archives: Alyson Drake

Carrel Keys Due by May 8th

SONY DSCStudents, please remember to turn in carrel keys by May 8, 2015.  Deposits will be forfeited if keys are not turned in on time.  Please make sure that you clean out your carrels by May 8th as well; any items left in carrels after May 8th will be discarded.

If you are going to be around this summer and want to retain your carrel over the summer, stop by the Circ Desk and fill out a summer extension form!

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Megan Brown

Megan and her awesome feline friend, Ziggy

Megan and her awesome feline friend, Ziggy

 

One of the most public faces in the law library is Megan Brown’s.  Not only does she help fulfill all of your ILL requests, but she (wo)mans the Circulation Desk to help you with anything you need from!  We asked Megan a few questions to get to know her a little better.

 

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question:  demonsWhat’s your mobydickfavorite book?
Just one?  How about two because they’re so different and I’m indecisive.  Demons, by Dostoevsky & Moby-Dick, by Melville.

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  Astronomer

3.  What profession would you not like to do?  Eh, corporate banking?

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4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  Commuting by bicycle and running.

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  Josh Smith

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  Algiers… Or maybe a secluded oceanfront spot on Nantucket.

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7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  Detach from technology.

Charleston_Peninsular_Charleston_Edmunds_Oast_Andy_Henderson_Jayce_McConnell_The_Red_Wedding_American_Brewery_Inline_Overlay8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  Last month in Charleston–Edmund’s Oast.

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  Cthulhu.  Ph’nglui mglw’nafh. R’lyeh wgah’nagi fhtagn….

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  Google…Just kidding!  Ask one of our lovely law reference librarians for help!

10 Things to Do in Columbia in April

With exams looming ever nearer, it’s especially important to take an hour or two now and again to clear your head and escape the law school bubble.  So, we’ve put together this great list of activities happening in April!

1. Get your picture taken with the Easter Bunny and hunt some for some eggs at the Annual Easter Egg Hunt at the Village at Sandhills (April 4, starting at 11am11).

2.  Remember your favorite movies by listening to the South Carolina Philharmonic play their famous tunes during “At the Movies” at the Harbison Theatre.  (April 11 at 7:30pm, $28).

3.  Are you an opera fanatic?  Check out USC’s Evening of One Acts.  (April 11 at 7:30pm and Sunday, April 12 at 3:00pm, FREE!).

Image result for film4.  Check out the Indie Grits Film Festival, the Southeast’s premier film and culture festival.  Held April 15-19, a five day pass is $100, but the opening night party on Wednesday April 15th from 6:00-11:00pm is free in the Columbia Museum Art plaza on Main Street.

5.  Love fashion?  Attend Girls Night Out 2015 to see the latest fashion and accessories from Tibi and enjoy cocktails and food from local favorites.  (April 16, $75, proceeds benefit EdVenture).

6.  One for all, and all for one!  Check out the USC Theatre Program’s production of the Three Musketeers (April 17-25, $12 for students).

7.  Take FIdo to Bark to the Park, a 1.5 mile walk fundraising event that benefits homeless pets in the Midlands.  (April 18, registration is $30, and includes a t-shirt and entry to the after-party and activities following the walk).

8.  Find some tasty international cuisine at the 20th Annual Columbia International Festival‘s International Food Court.  It’s located at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds on April 18-19).  Admission is $5 at the gate.

9.  Join the art gallery crawl for complimentary beverages and hors d’oeuvres at Artista Vista 2015 (April 23 from 5-9pm, free!). 

10.  Celebrate the successful completion of your LRAW exam by doing to see Camelot at the Koger Center.  (April 28-29, ticket prices vary).

 

Get out there and explore some of what Columbia has to offer!

 

Career Resources in Bloomberg Law

All law students know the stress of prepping for exams, often while multitasking to find a summer job.  While you’re all aware of the many exam prep resources available in or through the library (study aids, flash cards, CALI lessons!), did you know that your Bloomberg account can help you prepare to find and succeed at your summer job?

Bloomberg’s Career Resources Center has information on how to find connections at the places you want to interview, how to rock your interview, and how to be an awesome summer associate.

To find the Career Resources Center, look under the Law School Success heading, just under the Getting Started section on your Bloomberg homepage, and select the Career Resources link.

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Inside the Career Resources Center, you will find sections in Interview Preparation Help, Networking Tips, Job Search Tips on Resumes & Cover Letters, and Summer Associate & Internship Success Tips.  There are also tools to help you research judges, attorneys, and firms to find out more about the people and places with whom you want to interview.  Of particular value is the People Search, which allows you to search for alumni from U.S.C.

For example, you could do a search of people who went U.S.C. who are now judges.

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The list of results will bring up a list of judges who are U.S.C. School of Law Alumni.  Having a connection like this can help you immensely in your job search.  Of course, you can also run this search using your undergraduate Alma mater or any other number of factors.

Many of the articles on job searches, networking, and succeeding as a summer associate are written by hiring managers at law firms, who know first hand what makes an interviewee or a summer clerk stand out in a good way–or a bad way.

Good luck with your job hunt and your summer work experiences–you got this!

 

Getting to Know Your Library: Pamela Melton

CockydanceMany of you know Professor Pamela Melton from the 1L LRAW program or one of our upper-level research courses.  In addition to her teaching duties, Professor Melton serves as Associate Director for Library Administration.  She also keeps busy in law librarian professional organizations, currently serving as Immediate Past-President of the South Eastern Chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries.   We asked Professor Melton a few questions to get to know her a little better.

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question:  What’s your favorite book?  Anything by Anthony Trollope

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  Professional ballroom dancer

3.  What profession would you not like to do?  Dental hygienist

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  Any kind of partner dancing (ballroom, swing, salsa, Argentine Tango)

GeneKellydancing5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  Gene Kelly.  We’d hit every dance venue we could find, coast to coast.

6.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  I play Candy Crush.

7.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  Italy, Kenya, or the Galapagos Island.  I can’t pick just one.

8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  Last night (and every night) at home.  My husband is a wonderful cook.

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  Elayne Trakand, the Daughter-Heir of Andor

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  Master terms and connectors searching.  It’s the best way to use WestlawNext & Lexis Advance.

 

Celebrating the Magna Carta’s 800th Anniversary

Magna_Carta_(1297_version_with_seal,_owned_by_David_M_Rubenstein)Did you know that the Magna Carta is turning 800 years old this year?

The Magna Carta is the foundation of many freedoms enjoyed by people in more than 100 countries, as it limited the power of authoritarian rule and cemented legal ideas like trial by jury, religious liberty, and taxation limitations.

The original “Great Charter” was agreed to by King John on June 15, 1215, as he gave in to demands by barons and bishops to limit his power.  The original document would be revised several times in the first century after its creation.  The 1297 version of the Magna Carta went on to become part of English law.

500 or so years later, it became a crucial resource in the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

There are many opportunities to learn more about the Magna Carta during this anniversary year!  The first is Magna Carta 800th, a website devoted to explaining the history of the document and the influence that the Magna Carta has had worldwide.   It also includes projects, articles, and events that may be of interest, as well as an interactive map of where you can find remaining copies of the Magna Carta worldwide.  The education section includes information on the 25 barons and the important bishops who brought about the Magna Carta, as well as other resources for teaching.

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The University of South Carolina School of Law, along with the University Libraries, is also hosting Professor A.E. Dick Howard from the University of Virginia School of Law in a talk entitled, “Magna Carta: A Legacy 800 Years in the Making” on April 7th at 5:30pm in the Hollings Special Collection Library Program Room at Thoma Cooper Library.  The talk coincides with an exhibit on the Magna Carta.  For more information or to reserve a seat, email zmhilton@mailbox.sc.edu.  This is a great chance to learn more about an important document in legal history.

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Karen Taylor

taylorKaren Taylor is the Head of Access Services at the Law Library.  Ms. Taylor is our senior-most librarian and you can find her in the office behind the Circulation Desk.  We asked her a few questions to get to know her a little better.

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question: What’s your favorite book?  Trustee from the Toolroom by Nevil Shute

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  Archaeologist

3.  What profession would you not like to do?  Doctor

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  Swimming

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  My best friend

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  Great Britain

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7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  Gardening

8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  Last week, at home

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  Claire Randall (from the Outlander series)

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  Keep the search simple

 

 

Getting to Know Your Law Library: Joey Plumley

Joey Plumley is the Law Library’s Acquisitions and Access Services PLUMLEY, JOEY 142__084-1047Assistant.  In addition to working as a member of our Technical Services Department, you’ll find him working nights at the Circulation Desk.  We asked Joey a few questions to get to know him better!

1.  We’re librarians, so the obvious first question:  What’s your favorite book?  The Icewind Dale Trilogy.

2.  What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?  I have had a number of other professions before this one…but one I have not tried would be something in sports management.

3. What profession would you not like to do?  Not a farmer, construction worker, or miner.

4.  What’s your favorite form of exercise/outdoor activity?  I enjoy golf and tennis, but have not done either in a while due to a shoulder injury.

5.  If you could go on a road trip with any person (living or dead), whom would you choose?  I would choose my mom, who passed away a number of years ago.

6.  If you could visit any place in the world for a two-week vacation for free, where would you go?  If everything would be covered, then gambling in Law Vegas!!!1_Las_vegas_strip
7.  When you have 30 minutes of free time, how do you pass the time?  I try to catch up on current events or my favorite TV shows when I have the chance.

8.  When was the last time you had an amazing meal and where did you have it?  I recently had lunch at McCutchen House here on campus and it was very good.batman_color_by_txboi001-d4ad6u5

9.  If you could be any fictional character, who would you be?  I’m Batman.

10.  What’s your best (legal) research tip?  When asked by new law students, I always suggest that they get to know a reference librarian and make them their friend.

Celebrating Women’s History Month: Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act

In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month.  In recognition of this, we are taking a look back at the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.  The Act arose out of a Supreme Court case.

Lilly Ledbetter was an employee at the Goodyear Plant in Gadsden, Alabama.  Upon receiving an anonymous note revealing the salaries of her three male co-managers, she filed a complaint with the EEOC.  She had previously been the victim of sexual harassment at her workplace and had been told by her boss that he didn’t think a woman should be working at the plant.  Her case went to trial and the jury awarded her back-pay, as well as millions in compensatory and punitive damages for the discrimination she had faced.

The Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit reversed the jury’s verdict, arguing that the case was filed too late–despite the fact that she continued to receive discriminatory pay.  They reasoned that the company’s decision to pay her less than her male counterparts had been made years earlier.  The Supreme Court upheld the Eleventh Circuit’s decision in a 5-4 opinion, stating that employees can’t challenge ongoing pay discrimination if the original decision to pay the employee in a discriminatory fashion occurred more than 180 days earlier–even if that employee was continuing to be paid less.

The decision upset longstanding precedent under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and undermined Congress’s objectives to eliminate workplace discrimination.  In her dissenting opinion, Justice Ginsberg said pointed out that someone could still take action to fix this discriminatory treatment– “[o]nce again, the ball is in Congress’ court.”

In less than two years, Congress did just that, passing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009.  Under the act, each discriminatory paycheck resets the 180-day limit to file a claim, rather than the original decision to discriminate.  This allows employees who are unaware of discrimination initially to challenge pay discrimination when they find out about it.

To listen to the Supreme Court oral arguments or read the opinion, visit Oyez.